Select Month:Year: 
SunMonTueWedThuFri Sat
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930



Homilies Navchetana Apps, the first of its kind is produced and published by Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India

 

Subscribe and receive weekly Homilies

*Name:
*Email:

Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission

Homilies Navchetana is an initiative of Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India. We have been sending the Sunday and daily homilies last four years. We are grateful to you for your cooperation and encouraging comments. Navchetana is committed to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ through modern media and performing arts. Through our Web TV, audio and video productions and stage programmes we take the Gospel message to the ends of the earth. Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission.

Contact us: [email protected]



Comments
*Name:
*Email:
*Comments:
*Type the characters as seen on the image:
Captcha image

 


Homilies :: Latin Rite
Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time Download This Homily

September 2, 2019

Monday of the 21st Week in Ordinary Time


1 Thes 4: 13-18

Psalm 96:1&3, 4-5, 11-12, 13

 Lk 4: 16-30

 

Gospel Reading

 

Jesus came to Nazareth, where he had grown up, and went according to his custom into the synagogue on the Sabbath day. He stood up to read and was handed a scroll of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written:

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed meto bring glad tidings to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.

Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down, and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him. He said to them, "Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing." And all spoke highly of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth. They also asked, "Is this not the son of Joseph?" He said to them, "Surely you will quote me this proverb, 'Physician, cure yourself,' and say, 'Do here in your native place the things that we heard were done in Capernaum.'" And he said, "Amen, I say to you, no prophet is accepted in his own native place. Indeed, I tell you, there were many widows in Israel in the days of Elijah when the sky was closed for three and a half years and a severe famine spread over the entire land. It was to none of these that Elijah was sent, but only to a widow in Zarephath in the land of Sidon. Again, there were many lepers in Israel during the time of Elisha the prophet; yet not one of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian." When the people in the synagogue heard this, they were all filled with fury. They rose up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town had been built, to hurl him down headlong. But he passed through the midst of them and went away.

 

Reflection


The Mission of Jesus and Ours Too

 

In today’s Gospel we have one of the most talked about passages of the ministry of Jesus. At the beginning of his public ministry Jesus sets out the gist of his mission quoting from the Prophet Isaiah. This passage is called the ‘magnacarta’ of the ministry of Jesus.

 

The passage is set up in the outline of a traditional first century synagogue service. That usually included readings from the Torah followed by a reading from the Prophets, then benediction and a conclusion by the overseer of the synagogue. If a Rabbi was present he would give a sermon after the reading of the Scriptures. Jesus giving the sermon indicates the status he got as a ‘rabbi’. Elsewhere too we see people addressing him as rabbi and teacher. Also, scholars say that, this passage is the first extensively narrated act of Jesus’ public ministry in Luke. The passage presents Jesus as the one who is filled with and empowered by the Holy Spirit to proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom of the Heavenly Father.

 

Four groups of people get special mention in the passage: “the poor”, “the imprisoned”, “the blind”, and “the down trodden’. It is interesting to note that the introductory sermon that Jesus gave at the inauguration of his public ministry that too, in his home town, mentions nothing about the religious renewal or spiritual awakening. The stress is on “liberation”.

 

 After the centuries long foreign oppression most of the common men of Israel were literally poor. The oppressive foreign yoke had made them debtors and since they could not pay the debt back they were pushed to the prisons. “The blind” were one group that caught special attention in Jesus’ ministry. There were several instances where Jesus healed the blind. The reference could be to physical blindness as well as spiritual blindness. “The oppressed and the downtrodden” was the clearest terms the common folk of Jesus’ times could identify themselves with.

 

In a single sentence Jesus gives them the consolation: “In your hearing this prophecy is fulfilled.” The new day of freedom is dawned upon the people of God. The messiah has arrived. There will be no more oppression, blindness, imprisonment and poverty. The poor will be enjoying sumptuous meal, the oppressed and the imprisoned will be set free and they will begin to see again the glory and beauty of the Kingdom of God.

 

The passage speaks in clear terms about our connection to the poor, the marginalized, the battered, the oppressed and the downtrodden. This is the core of the mission of Jesus. That should be ours too.  The challenge before us is to take up the mission of Jesus in our times. Are we ready for that? It is not for any future times. It is to be actualized today and this time. One simple question will be enough to measure our level of commitment: Are we able to find the poor and the oppressed in our offices, in our campuses, in our work places, in our neighborhood and perhaps in our own families and communities? That is a big question.

 

 

Dr Martin Mallathu CMI


Homilies Navchetana Apps, the first of its kind is produced and published by Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India to assist the clergy to preach the World of God and also as a handy spiritual resource for the people of God to reflect on the daily spiritual passages at their convenience. You can download this on your Android phone from Google play and you can see the Gospel reflections of the whole year. The size of this app is just 2.5 MB. We welcome your suggestions and contributions to server you better.

May God Bless you

Fr. James M L CMI

Get it on Google Play

Homilies Navchetana is an initiative of Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India. We have been sending the Sunday and daily homilies last four years. We are grateful to you for your cooperation and encouraging comments. Navchetana is committed to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ through modern media and performing arts. Through our Web TV, audio and video productions and stage programmes we take the Gospel message to the ends of the earth. Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission.


Back To Current Homilies