Select Month:Year: 
SunMonTueWedThuFri Sat
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930



Homilies Navchetana Apps, the first of its kind is produced and published by Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India

 

Subscribe and receive weekly Homilies

*Name:
*Email:

Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission

Homilies Navchetana is an initiative of Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India. We have been sending the Sunday and daily homilies last four years. We are grateful to you for your cooperation and encouraging comments. Navchetana is committed to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ through modern media and performing arts. Through our Web TV, audio and video productions and stage programmes we take the Gospel message to the ends of the earth. Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission.

Contact us: [email protected]



Comments
*Name:
*Email:
*Comments:
*Type the characters as seen on the image:
Captcha image

 


Homilies :: Latin Rite
Wednesday of the 23rd week in Ordinary Time Download This Homily

September 11, 2019

Wednesday of the 23rd week in Ordinary Time

 

Col 3:1-11

Psalm 145:2-3, 10-11, 12-13ab

Lk 6:20-26

 

Gospel Reading

 

Raising his eyes toward his disciples Jesus said: "Blessed are you who are poor, for the Kingdom of God is yours. Blessed are you who are now hungry, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who are now weeping, for you will laugh. Blessed are you when people hate you, and when they exclude and insult you, and denounce your name as evil on account of the Son of Man. Rejoice and leap for joy on that day! Behold, your reward will be great in heaven.  For their ancestors treated the prophets in the same way.


But woe to you who are rich, for you have received your consolation. But woe to you who are filled now, for you will be hungry. Woe to you who laugh now, for you will grieve and weep. Woe to you when all speak well of you, for their ancestors treated the false prophets in this way."

 

Reflection


Hunger and Poverty Have No Place in the Kingdom of God

 

There are more than one billion hungry people in the world according to the latest estimates by the by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. The world produces enough food to feed everyone. World agriculture produces 17 percent more calories per person today than it did 30 years ago, despite a 70 percent population increase. This is enough to provide everyone in the world with at least 2,720 kilocalories (kcal) per person per day according to the estimates by FAO.  The principal problem is that many people in the world do not have sufficient income to purchase enough food. Hence poverty and hunger are interrelated. One of the main reasons for poverty and hunger are unequal distribution of the resources and reluctance by people those who enough and excess to share with those who do not have. In spite of having one billion hungry people in the world, 130 core tones of food are wasted in a year according to a news item published in Danik Bhaskar on the World Environment Day 2013. In India one fifth of the food cooked for marriages is being wasted. Wasting food when one billion people starve amounts to a criminal act.


Jesus calls the poor and the hungry blessed in today’s Gospel passage not because poverty and hunger are blessings; both of them are evils to be eradicated from the face of the earth. He calls them blessed because his mission is to create a new situation in which there will be no hunger and poverty and this is what we find in the communities of the early Christians as described in the Acts of the Apostles (Acts 4: 32-36).


Feeding the hungry and healing the sick were two prominent dimensions of Jesus mission of integral liberation of people. At the same time Jesus wanted a radical change in the attitude of the rich. He warned them of terrible consequences if they are not ready to share their resources with the poor. The disciples of Jesus have to adopt a two pronged approach to deal with hunger and poverty. On the one hand they have to motivate and encourage the rich and the well to do to share their resources with the poor and the needy. On the other hand they have to empower the poor by building their capacities as well as enabling them to access their rights to come out of the situation of poverty. Feeding the poor in the literal sense is below human dignity except in the case of people who are incapacitated to work and there is no one to take care of them. Otherwise the approach should be supporting the poor to earn their livelihood and eat with dignity without resorting to begging bowls.  The people who distribute free food may have the satisfaction of doing a great charity, but in that process they are degrading the poor to the status of beggars. Does Jesus, who restored the human dignity of the poor, want us to continue this paternalistic approach?

 

Fr. Jacob Peenikaprambil CMI

 


Homilies Navchetana Apps, the first of its kind is produced and published by Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India to assist the clergy to preach the World of God and also as a handy spiritual resource for the people of God to reflect on the daily spiritual passages at their convenience. You can download this on your Android phone from Google play and you can see the Gospel reflections of the whole year. The size of this app is just 2.5 MB. We welcome your suggestions and contributions to server you better.

May God Bless you

Fr. James M L CMI

Get it on Google Play

Homilies Navchetana is an initiative of Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India. We have been sending the Sunday and daily homilies last four years. We are grateful to you for your cooperation and encouraging comments. Navchetana is committed to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ through modern media and performing arts. Through our Web TV, audio and video productions and stage programmes we take the Gospel message to the ends of the earth. Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission.


Back To Current Homilies