Select Month:Year: 
SunMonTueWedThuFri Sat
01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30



Homilies Navchetana Apps, the first of its kind is produced and published by Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India

 

Subscribe and receive weekly Homilies

*Name:
*Email:

Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission

Homilies Navchetana is an initiative of Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India. We have been sending the Sunday and daily homilies last four years. We are grateful to you for your cooperation and encouraging comments. Navchetana is committed to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ through modern media and performing arts. Through our Web TV, audio and video productions and stage programmes we take the Gospel message to the ends of the earth. Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission.

Contact us: navchetana@gmail.com



Comments
*Name:
*Email:
*Comments:
*Type the characters as seen on the image:
Captcha image

 


Homilies :: Latin Rite
Sunday of the 7th Week of Easter Download This Homily

June 2, 2019

Sunday of the 7th Week of Easter

 

 

Acts 1:1-11;

Psalm 47:2-3, 6-9;

Ephesians 1:17-23 or

Hebrews 9:24-28; 10:19-23;

Gospel LK 24:46-53


Jesus said to his disciples:
"Thus it is written that the Christ would suffer
and rise from the dead on the third day
and that repentance, for the forgiveness of sins,
would be preached in his name
to all the nations, beginning from Jerusalem.
You are witnesses of these things. 
And behold I am sending the promise of my Father upon you;
but stay in the city
until you are clothed with power from on high."

Then he led them out as far as Bethany,
raised his hands, and blessed them.
As he blessed them he parted from them
and was taken up to heaven.
They did him homage
and then returned to Jerusalem with great joy,
and they were continually in the temple praising God.

 

 

Ascension Sunday

 

Ascension Day is a day of mystery, a day of joy. Jesus leaves his disciples to go to the heavenly Father and promises to return. St Luke tries to make sense of all this for us. Today's Gospel and the reading from the Acts of the Apostles - both written by Luke tell us some things about the mystery of Jesus' ascension. Luke's Gospel concludes with Jesus promising to send his Spirit upon us and then being taken to heaven. At that point, the Acts of the Apostles begins. That exaltation of Jesus marks the conclusion of one age and the beginning of a new one. There is a sense of urgency about it all, the emphasis being on the need for action. When our Lord ascended into heaven he passed a baton of his work to apostles. They in turn passed it on to us. “You are my witnesses” Acts 1:8, said Jesus before his ascension.

 

When Jesus was lifted up in a cloud, he moved from earth where his presence was a matter of fact to a presence with us that is a matter of faith. Without leaving us, he is accepted by the Father and enthroned in glory. While Luke speaks of “a cloud” which took Jesus out of a sight, Mark mentions about the “right hand of God”. Both expressions have almost the same purpose: to evoke the glorification of Jesus in a symbolic way. Yet the symbolism of the cloud is even more significant ever since the time of Israelites sojourn through the desert. They considered the cloud as a sign of God's presence among men. In the Bible the cloud is one of the current evocations of God's glory. "A thick cloud was upon the mountain" (Ex 19:16) when Moses received the Law on Sinai. It is also the equivalent of the cloud on Sinai which filled the Temple when Isaiah heard God's call (Cf Is 6:4). The cloud is the same as the cloud that engulfed the tabernacle in the desert, the cloud which surrounded the Temple when it was dedicated, and the cloud of the transfiguration. Even more important than that is, the cloud is very closely connected with the image of the Son of man. The book of Daniel reads: "Behold, with the clouds of heaven there came one like a Son of man ... and to him was given dominion and glory and kingdom" (Dan 7:13-14). For the people of the Old Testament this Son of man was the Messiah. So, when he mentions the cloud at the moment of the Ascension, Luke indicates that Jesus is the long-awaited Messiah. Let us feel him in our midst.

 

And his presence to us right now brings him - and his warmth, his care, his love - even closer to each of us than we are to each other. Both the Gospel and the Acts record some of Jesus' last instructions before telling us of his ascension itself. Luke's Gospel says that the Apostles were to preach penance for the remission of sins "in his name" (v. 47). A frequent theme in Luke's Acts of the Apostles as well, this term expresses faith in the divinity of Jesus. Also a theme of the Acts is Jesus' instruction in the Gospel that all His followers are to preach his Gospel to all the nations. Our preaching and good example to those not of the faith are important works among our fellow human beings, just as undertakings among the Gentiles were important in the early Church. As the Gospel tells us, that work was to go to all the nations, beginning from Jerusalem (v. 47); as the Acts puts it, the Apostles will be his witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth (v. 8). Christianity should not be only at head but hand to be practiced.

 

A true story- happened in 1892 at Stanford University: An 18-year-old student was struggling to pay his fees. He was an orphan, and not knowing where to turn for money, he came up with a bright idea. He and a friend decided to host a musical concert on campus to raise money for their education. They reached out to the great pianist Ignacy J. Paderewski. His manager demanded a guaranteed fee of $2000 for the piano recital. A deal was struck and the boys began to work to make the concert a success.


The big day arrived. But unfortunately, they had not managed to sell enough tickets. The total collection was only $1600. Disappointed, they went to Paderewski and explained their plight. They gave him the entire $1600, plus a cheque for the balance $400. They promised to honour the cheque at the soonest possible. “No,” said Paderewski. “This is not acceptable.” He tore up the cheque, returned the $1600 and told the two boys: “Here’s the $1600. Please deduct whatever expenses you have incurred. Keep the money you need for your fees. And just give me whatever is left”. The boys were surprised, and thanked him profusely. It was a small act of kindness. But it clearly marked out Paderewski as a great human being.


Paderewski later went on to become the Prime Minister of Poland. He was a great leader, but unfortunately when the World War began, Poland was ravaged. There were more than 1.5 million people starving in his country, and no money to feed them. Paderewski did not know where to turn for help. He reached out to the US Food and Relief Administration for help. The head there was a man called Herbert Hoover — who later went on to become the US President. Hoover agreed to help and quickly shipped tons of food grains to feed the starving Polish people.

 

A calamity was averted. Paderewski was relieved. He decided to go across to meet Hoover and personally thank him. When Paderewski began to thank Hoover for his noble gesture, Hoover quickly interjected and said, “You shouldn’t be thanking me Mr. Prime Minister. You may not remember this, but several years ago, you helped two young students go through college. I was one of them.” The world is a wonderful place. What goes around comes around!

 

 

The "two men in white robes" who stood by the Apostles and sent them home after the Ascension are symbols of joy. In the Old Testament when the Ecclesiastes invited his readers to be glad, he said: "Let your garments be always white; let not oil be lacking on your head (Eccles 9:8). The glorification of Christ brought joy to men. On the morning of the Resurrection these two men had said: "Why do you seek the living among the dead?" (Lk 24:5). Actually what these two men in white robes want to say is this: "Don't look up into the sky. Look before you!" In other words, God does not dwell up there in the sky, but he is still in our midst and will manifest himself again to us at the end of times. That is why Jesus told his Apostles: "Go into the entire world and preach the Gospel to the whole creation ... and I am with you always, to the close of the age" (Mk 16, 15; Mt 28, 20). It is for this reason, too, that the love of neighbor becomes, for Jesus' disciples, the sign of an authentic love of God. It is no more to heaven that we should look to find God, but around us and, above all, in us. Luke ends his Gospel by saying that, after the Ascension of Jesus, the disciples "returned to Jerusalem," indicating that the normal course of things is resumed. He adds, "With great joy," because from that moment onwards the course of things receives a new direction, a new purpose, and it is Jesus who gives it.

 

We can't just keep looking up to heaven. We have a mission from Jesus. We must grow in on our own spiritual life and should give Jesus, whom we experienced, to the world. Today’s emphasis on the role of the Holy Spirit assures us that in that work we don't walk alone.

 

 

Fr. Nithin Vaidhykaran CMI


Homilies Navchetana Apps, the first of its kind is produced and published by Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India to assist the clergy to preach the World of God and also as a handy spiritual resource for the people of God to reflect on the daily spiritual passages at their convenience. You can download this on your Android phone from Google play and you can see the Gospel reflections of the whole year. The size of this app is just 2.5 MB. We welcome your suggestions and contributions to server you better.

May God Bless you

Fr. James M L CMI

Get it on Google Play

Homilies Navchetana is an initiative of Navchetana Communications, Bhopal, India. We have been sending the Sunday and daily homilies last four years. We are grateful to you for your cooperation and encouraging comments. Navchetana is committed to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ through modern media and performing arts. Through our Web TV, audio and video productions and stage programmes we take the Gospel message to the ends of the earth. Make a donation and be a part of this noble mission.


Back To Current Homilies